Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Watergate

Disclaimer: The formatting of these archives are arranged irregularly. It has taken me hours organizing, editing, etc… Still, I wasn’t able to get to all the text corrections. Enjoy, Lisa

impeach Nixon1

Statement of information: Hearings and Internet Archives

HEARINGS BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

NINETY-THIRD CONGRESS SECOND SESSION PURSUANT TO H. Res. 803

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY TO INVESTIGATE WHETHER SUFFICIENT GROUNDS EXIST FOR THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES TO EXERCISE ITS CONSTITUTIONAL POWER TO IMPEACH

RICHARD M. NIXON PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Book VIII

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

MAY-JUNE 1974 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

36-928—0 WASHINGTON : 1974

On February 6, 1974, the House of Representatives adopted by a vote of 410-4 the following House Resolution 803:

RESOLVED, That the Committee on the Judiciary acting as a whole or by any subcommittee thereof appointed by the Chairman for the purposes hereof and in accordance with the Rules of the Committee, is authorized and directed to investigate fully and completely whether sufficient grounds exist for the House of Representatives to exercise its constitutional power to impeach Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States of America. The committee shall report to the House of Representatives such resolutions, articles of impeachment, or other recommendations as it deems proper.

impeach Nixon

Beginning in November 1973, acting under resolutions referred to the Committee by the Speaker of the House and with a special appropriation, I had begun to organize a special staff to investigate serious charges against the President of the United States.

On May 9, 1974, as Chairman of the Committee on the Judiciary, I convened the Committee for hearings to review the results of the Impeachment Inquiry staff’s Investigation. The staff began its initial presentation the same day, in executive session, pursuant to the Committee’s Impeachment Inquiry Procedures adopted on May 2, 1974.

By June 21, the Inquiry staff had concluded its initial presentation.

On June 25, the Committee voted to make public the initial presentation including substantially all of the supporting material presented at the hearings. The Committee also voted to make public the President’s response, which was presented to the Committee on June 27 and June 28 in the same form and manner as the Inquiry staff’s initial presentation.

Statements of information and supporting evidential material were compiled by the Inquiry staff in 36 notebooks and furnished in this form to each Member of the Committee. The notebooks presented material on several subjects of the Inquiry: the Watergate break-in and its aftermath, ITT, dairy price supports, domestic surveillance, the relationship between the President and his staff and the IRS, and the activities of the Special Prosecutors. In each notebook a statement of information relating to a particular phase of the investigation was immediately followed by supporting evidential material, which included copies of documents and testimony (much already on public record), transcripts of Presidential conversations and affidavits.

The staff also presented to the Committee written reports on President Nixon’s income taxes. Presidential impoundment of funds appropriated by Congress, and the bombing of Cambodia.

nixon_cambodia

Book VIII, presented to the Committee in two volumes, dealt with alleged efforts by White House officials from 1970 through 1973 to use the Internal Revenue Service for “political purposes,” to acquire confidential information from the IRS and to direct certain IRS activities.

Evidence was presented regarding White House requests that the IRS investigate the financial affairs of certain Taxpayers and provide White House officials with confidential information about certain taxpayers. Evidence was also presented regarding the creation of White House lists of political “opponents” and “enemies.”

In a few instances. Ranking Minority Member Mr. Hutchinson and I determined, pursuant to authority granted us by the Committee, to defer the release of evidential material or to delete it for one of the following reasons :

1)   Because the public interest in making the material public was outweighed by the potential prejudice to the rights of defendants under indictment and awaiting trial,

2)   Because the information was classified or otherwise required confidential treatment,

3)   Because the material was only marginally pertinent and was considered to be defamatory, degrading or embarrassing, or,

4)   Because the material was not pertinent to Presidential responsibility within the outer limits of an impeachable offense within the meaning of the Constitution.

The Committee on the Judiciary is working to follow faithfully its mandate “to investigate fully and completely” whether or not sufficient grounds exist to recommend that the House exercise its constitutional power of Impeachment.

I believe that the readers of these volumes will see that the Committee’s primary effort in carrying out its mandate has been to obtain an objective, impartial presentation which will enable each Member of the Committee to make an Informed judgment in fulfilling his or her constitutional responsibility.

Every effort was made to preclude inferences in the presentation of this material. A deliberate and scrupulous abstention from conclusions, by implication, was observed.

With respect to the Presidential recorded conversations, the Committee determined to hear the recorded conversations in their entirety. The Presidential recorded conversations were neither paraphrased nor summarized by the inquiry staff. Thus, no inferences, or conclusions were drawn for the Committee. During the course of the hearings, Members of the Committee heard each recording and simultaneously followed transcripts prepared by the inquiry staff. Each of these transcripts is reprinted under the appropriate statement of information.

During the course of the hearings, the Committee found it necessary to issue a subpoena to President Nixon requiring him to furnish to the Committee a tape recording of a portion of a Presidential conversation held on September 15, 1972 relating to the Internal Revenue Service, and to furnish memorandum, notes, and other writings and things relating to this conversation. The President has not yet responded to this subpoena.

I also believe that the publication of the record of these hearings will provide readers with a clear idea of the particulars of the investigation and that the proximity of the evidence will assure them that no statement of information is offered without supporting evidential material.

July 1974

CONTENTS

Introductory Statement of Information 1 Statement of Information and Supporting Evidence 33.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The material contained in this volume is presented in two sections. Section 1 contains a statement of information footnoted with citations to evidentiary material. Section 2 contains the same statement of information followed by the supporting material.

Supporting material consists of information obtained at hearings before the Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities; information developed in executive session by other Congressional committees; information furnished to the Committee by the Grand Jury of the District of Columbia and by other grand juries; information furnished to the Committee by government agencies; transcripts of tape recordings of conversations among President Nixon and his key associates prepared by the Committee staff; information furnished to the Committee by the President, the Executive Departments of the Government, the Special Prosecutor, and other information obtained by the Committee, much of which was already on the public record.

Each page of supporting evidence is labeled with the footnote number and a description of the document or the name of the witness testifying. Copies of entire pages of documents and testimony are included, with brackets around the portions pertaining to the statement of information. Markings on the documents include item numbers and receipt stamps of the House Judiciary Committee and other agencies from which the Committee received material.

In a few Instances, names of persons In sensitive positions have been deleted from documents at the request of the CIA, FBI and other investigative agencies. Some documents contained deletions when the Committee received them.

In the citation of sources, the following abbreviations are used: “SSC” for Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities; “SJC” for Senate Judiciary Committee; and “HJC” for House Judiciary Committee.

STATEMENT OF INFORMATION INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

1.   On or about March 21, 1970 Special Counsel to the President Clark Mollenhoff sent a memorandum to H. R. Haldeman transmitting material on the taxes of Governor George Wallace’s brother, Gerald Wallace.

Mollenhoff has stated that he had been instructed by Haldeman to obtain a report from IRS on investigations relating to Governor George Wallace and Gerald Wallace; that he had been assured by Haldeman that the report was to be obtained at the request of the President; that he obtained the report from the IRS; and that Mollenhoff did not give a copy of the report to anyone other than Haldeman or discuss the substance of it with anyone else until after the appearance of an article on April 13, 1970 regarding confidential field reports, and IRS investigation of charges of corruption in the Wallace Administration and the activities of Gerald Wallace.

Former Commissioner of Internal Revenue Randolph Thrower has stated that an IRS investigation concluded that the material had not been leaked by the IRS or the Treasury Department. Thrower has stated that thereafter he and the IRS Chief Counsel met with Haldeman and Ehrlichman at the White House and discussed with them the seriousness of the leak and the fact that unauthorized disclosure of IRS information constituted a criminal act.

Randolph Thrower

Randolph Thrower

 1.1Memorandum from Clark Mollenhoff to H. R. Haldeman, March 21, 1970 (received from Watergate Special Prosecution Force) 36

1.2Washington Post. April 13, 1970, Bill 37

1.3Clark Mollenhoff affidavit submitted to House

 Judiciary Committee, June A, 1974 38

1.4Randolph Thrower affidavit submitted to House

 Judiciary Committee, May 24, 1974 40

2.   On September 21, 1970 White House aide Tom Charles Huston sent a memorandum to Haldeman transmitting a report on an investigation by the IRS Special Service Group of political activities of tax-exempt organizations. Huston discussed administrative action against the organizations and stated that valuable intelligence-type information could be turned up by IRS as a result of their field audits.

2.1Memorandum from Tom Charles Huston to H. R. Haldeman, September 21, 1970, with attachments, SSC Exhibit No. 42, 3 SSC 1338-45 44

3.   Former Commissioner of Internal Revenue Thrower has stated that during the summer of 1970 he was advised by Under Secretary of the Treasury Charls Walker that John Caulfleld, head of security for the President’s office, was interested in the position of Director of the IRS Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms Division (ATF) and had the President’s blessing and the support of top people at the White House. Thrower concluded that Caulfleld was not qualified for the position.

Thrower has stated that in November 1970 he was told by Walker that the White House wanted Caulfleld to be considered for the position of Chief of the Enforcement

Branch of ATF and that the White House wanted to take the Enforcement Branch out of ATF and have it report directly to Thrower rather than through the chain of command. Thrower has stated that he told Walker that Thrower would resign if Caulfleld were appointed and the organizational changes were required. Thrower has stated that shortly thereafter he was advised that the White House would drop the matter.

Randolph Thrower affidavit submitted to House Judiciary Committee, May 24, 1974 54

4.   Thrower has stated that in January 1971, having decided to submit his resignation as Counselor of Internal Revenue, he attempted unsuccessfully through Treasury Secretary Kennedy and Attorney General Mitchell to arrange a meeting with the President to express his concern that any suggestion of the introduction of political influence into the IRS would be very damaging to the President and his administration as well as to the revenue system and the general public Interest.

Thrower has stated that he was told by the President’s Appointment Secretary Dwlght Chapln that the President had received Thrower’s views from the Attorney General and did not feel a conference was necessary. Thrower thereupon submitted his resignation.

A.l Randolph Thrower affidavit submitted to House Judiciary Committee, May 24, 1974.

5. From June 2A, 1971 through June 1972, members of Colson’s staff circulated to various White House staff members names for and deletions from a list of political opponents. Dean has testified that the list was continually being updated, and the file was several inches thick.

Charles Colson

Charles Colson

Colson has stated that the list maintained by George Bell of his office was primarily intended for the use of the social office and the personnel office in considering White House invitations and appointments.

5.1 John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1350, 1386-87, 1409-11 66

5.2 Memorandum from George Bell to John Dean, Jerry Warren, Van Shumway, June 24, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 49,SSC 1693-96 72

5.3 Letter from Charles Colson to Fred Thompson and Samuel Dash, June 28, 1973 (received from SSC) 76

6.   On July 20, 1971 John Dean wrote a memorandum to Ehrlichman’s aide Egll Krogh attaching Information compiled by John Caulfleld regarding the Brookings Institution’s tax returns and noting that Brookings received a number of large government contracts. Caulfleld has testified that it was his Impression that this was public information.

On July 27, 1971 Dean sent a memorandum to Krogh to which was attached a carbon copy of Dean’s July 20, 1971 memorandum on which the words “receives a number of large government contracts” were underscored and a marginal note by Haldeman stated that these should be turned off.

Dean’s July 27, 1971 memorandum stated that he assumed that Krogh was turning off the spigot.

 6.1Memorandum from John Dean to Egll Krogh, July 20, 1971, with attachment (received from White House)

6.2Memorandum from John Dean to Egll Krogh, July 27, 1971, with attachment (received from White House)

6.3John Caulfleld testimony, SSC Executive Session,

March 23, 197A, 34-35

7* Dean has testified that on August 16, 1971 he prepared a memorandum entitled. Dealing with our Political Enemies, which addressed the matter of how the Administration could use the available federal machinery against its political enemies.

Among Dean’s suggestions was that key members of the staff should determine who was giving the Administration a hard time, and that they develop a list of names — not more than ten — as targets for concentration. Dean has testified that to the best of his recollection the memorandum was sent forward to Haldeman and Ehrlichman for approval, disapproval, or comment. Ehrlichman testified that he could not recall receiving any memorandum with respect to the enemies list from Dean or any other person in the White House.

John Dean

7.1John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1349-50, 1411

7.2Memorandum (unsigned and unaddressed), August 16, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 48, 4 SSC 1689-90

7 . 3 John Ehrlichman testimony, 7 SSC 2683-84 101

8.   On September 9, 1971 Colson sent Dean a memorandum stating that he had checked in blue those to whom he would give top priority. Dean testified that attached to Colson’s memorandum was an opponent’s list memorandum from Bell dated June 24, 1971 and a document entitled “Opponent Priority Activity” containing the names and brief descriptions of 20 political opponents with check marks beside eleven of the names.

8.1John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1350 104

8.2Memorandum from Charles Colson to John Dean, September 9, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 49, 4 SSC 1692-96 105

 9.   On or about September 14, 1971 Dean sent to Haldeman’s aide, Lawrence Higby, a list of names Higby requested. Most of the names were the same as those checked by Colson on the list attached to the September 9, 1971 memorandum discussed in the preceding paragraph. Dean testified that upon a request from Haldeman that he wanted to nail this doira (?) as to the 20, or the minimum number with whom they could do something Dean sent the list to Higby for Haldeman’s final review.

On several occasions thereafter, Dean received names for the enemy’s project from Higby and Strachan, also an aide of Haldeman. Dean testified that he also received a list of McGovem campaign staff prepared at Ehrlichman’s direction by CRP Director of Ballot Security Murray Chotiner. Dean has testified that the lists were principally used by Colson and Haldeman and that he did not know what they did with them.

Haldeman has testified that “enemy’s” lists or “opponent’s” lists were used for withholding White House courtesies and invitations from those who had expressed opposition to Administration policies.

Lawrence Higby

9.1John Dean testimony, A SSC 1350, 1408-10, 1529 113

9.2Memorandum from John Dean to Lawrence Higby, September 14, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 50, 4 SSC 1697-98 118

9.3Memorandum from Gordon Strachan to John Dean, September 17, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 52, 4 SSC 1700 120

9.4Memorandum from Gordon Strachan to John Dean, October 26, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 53, 4 SSC 1701-02 121

9.5Memorandum from Gordon Strachan to John Dean, November 5, 1971, SSC Exhibit No. 54, 4 SSC 1703-04 123

9.6Note from Lawrence Higby to John Dean, undated, SSC Exhibit No. 51, A SSC 1699 126

9.7H. R. Haldeman testimony, 8 SSC 3154-56 127

10.On September 22, 1971 John Caulfleld wrote a memorandum regarding plans for scheduling Lawrence Goldberg to function in the Jewish area at the Committee for the relection of the President.

Caulfield stated that Goldberg was actively engaged in Anti-Defamation League activities and that consideration should be given to a potential question of loyalty.

Jack Caulfield

Jack Caulfield, who has died aged 83, was one of Richard Nixon’s masters of dirty tricks but walked away from the Watergate scandal that caused the President’s downfall.

On October 6, 1971 Caulfield sent a memorandum to Dean attaching lists of charitable contributions from Goldberg’s tax returns and stating that it postured an extremely heavy involvement in Jewish organizational activity. Caulfield also stated that Attorney General Mitchell should be discreetly made aware in this regard. 

nixon and haldeman telegrams

Caulfield has testified that he obtained information on Goldberg’s financial status from IRS Assistant Commissioner (Inspection) Vernon.Acree and that the purpose of obtaining the information was to determine whether Goldberg was financially solvent and therefore able to assume a campaign position at CRP.

10.1           Memorandum by Jack Caulfield, September 22, 1971 (received from SSC) 132

10.2           Memorandum from John Caulfield to John Dean, with attachments, October 6, 1971 (received from SSC) 133

10.3           John Caulfield testimony, SSC Executive Session,

March 23, 197A, 56-62 138

11.On or about September 30, 1971 Caulfleld sent a memorandum to Dean reporting on IRS tax audit information about Rev. Billy Graham.

Caulfield testified that he obtained the information from Assistant Commissioner Acree. On October 1, 1971 Higby sent a copy of Caulfield ‘s memorandum to Haldeman with a transmittal slip bearing the hand-written notation, “Can we do anything to help,” below which is Haldeman’s hand-written notation, “No, it’s already covered.” Dean has testified that the President had asked that the IRS be turned off on friends of his.

 11.1           Memorandum from John Caulfield to John Dean, September 30, 1971 with attached routing slip (received from SSC) 146

11.2           John Caulfield testimony, SSC Executive Session, March 23, 1974, 46-50 148

11.3           John Dean testimony, SSC Executive Session,

June 16, 1973, 95-96 153

12.On or about October 6, 1971 Caulfield sent a memorandum to Dean transmitting information about tax audits of John Wayne and eight other entertainers and former entertainers which Caulfield had instructed the IRS to furnish. Caulfield has testified that he obtained the information from Acree.

12.1           Memorandum from John Caulfield to John Dean,

October 6, 1971 (received from SSC) 156

12.2           John Caulfield testimony, SSC Executive Session, March 23, 197A, 54-56 161

13.From October 6 through October 13, 1971 News day published installments of an article on C.G.Rebozo. Dean has testified that after the article was published he was instructed by Haldeman that one of the authors of the article should have some problems.

President Richard Nixon and his pal Bebe Rebozo in Key Biscayne, Fla., in 1969. A new book by a former White House reporter claims the two may have been lovers.

President Richard Nixon and his pal Bebe Rebozo in Key Biscayne, Fla., in 1969. A new book by a former White House reporter claims the two may have been lovers.

Dean and Caulfield discussed procedures to institute an audit of Robert Greene, a News day reporter who had written the article. Caulfield has testified that he discussed the request with Acree who told Caulfield that an audit could be instigated by use of an anonymous letter. Caulfield has testified that Acree later informed him that the procedure was followed.

The staff of the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation has stated that Greene was not audited by the IRS but was subsequently audited by New York State tax authorities on the basis of information supplied under the Federal/State exchange program, but that the staff believes that the audit was unrelated to Greene’s being classified as a White House enemy.

13.1           John Dean testimony, 3 SSC 1072 166

13.2           John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1480 167

13.3           John Caulfield testimony, SSC Executive Session,

March 23, 1974, 62-64 168

13.4           Newsday, October 6-13, 1971, 3R. 171

13.5           Memorandum from John Caulfield to John Dean,

September 10, 1971 (received from SSC) 173

13.6           Report of the staff of the Joint Committee on

Internal Revenue Taxation, “Investigation into

Certain Charges of the Use of the Internal Revenue

Service for Political Purposes,” December 20, 1973, 12 174

warren commission

14.Dean has testified that he received requests from Haldeman to have audits commenced on certain individuals. Haldeman has testified that he could recall no specific requests but that information that had come to the attention of the White House or information that appeared to indicate a reason for an audit may have been referred by the White House to the IRS.

Caulfleld has testified that some time after Dean’s request for an audit of Greene, Dean met with Caulfleld and Acree and directed that full audits be conducted of three or four other individuals. Caulfleld has testified that he and Acree decided not to conduct the audits and that so far as he knew no audits were conducted of any individuals.

14.1           John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1479-80 176

14.2           H. R. Haldeman testimony, 8 SSC 3137 ] 78

14.3           John Caulfleld testimony, SSC Executive Session,

March 23, 1974, 64-65, 113-14 179

15.On October 15, 1971 Caulfield wrote a memorandum to Dean recommending that background information obtained from the FBI about the producer of a motion picture derogatory to the President be released to the media and that discreet IRS audits be instituted on the producer, the distributor of the film and a related corporation. Caulfield testified that Dean requested he run an FBI name-check and that, at Caulfield ‘s direction, Anthony Ulasewicz conducted a “pretext inquiry” at the offices of the film’s distributor.

On October 20, 1971 Caulfield sent a memorandum to Dean reporting on a pretext interview of the film’s distributor and recommending that because the financial handling and distribution of the film was in the hands of amateurs, any actions against the producer. Including background information and IRS capability, be carefully weighed and well hidden.

15.1           Memoranda from John Caulfield to John Dean, June

25, 1971, October 13, 1971; October 15, 1971; October 20, 1971, with attached undated memorandum from Fred Fielding to John Dean; Exhibit 3, Hearing held before Subcommittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure and Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights of the Committee on the Judiciary, and Subcommittee on Surveillance of the Committee on Foreign Relations , April 8, 1974 184

15.2           John Caulfield testimony, SSC Executive Session,

March 23, 1974, 88, 102-03 192

X6. Prior to November 7, 1971 a talking paper and memorandum were prepared with respect to making the IRS politically responsive. Dean has testified that he and Caulfield prepared the documents for Haldeman’s use during a meeting with either the Secretary of the Treasury or the Commissioner of Internal Revenue.

Haldeman has testified that he could not recall either seeing the briefing memorandum or having any specific conversation with the Secretary of the Treasury.

16.1           Briefing Memorandum (undated and unsigned), SSC Exhibit No. 44, 4 SSC 1682-85 196

16.2           John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1349, 1410-11 200

16.3           H. R. Haldeman testimony, 8 SSC 3136-37 203

g gordon liddy

17.In a Political Matters Memorandum dated December 2, 1971 Strachan reported to Haldeman that Mitchell and Dean had discussed the need to develop a political intelligence capability. Strachan stated that Sandwedge had been scrapped and that instead Gordon Liddy would become

general counsel to CRP effective December 6, 1971. Strachan stated that Liddy would handle political intelligence as well as legal matters and would also work with Dean on the political enemies project.

17.1           Memorandum from Gordon Strachan to H. R. Haldeman, December 2, 1971 (received from White House), 206

18.In early 1972 John Dean sent a memorandum to Haldeman, Ehrlichman, Klein, Colson and Zlegler, with a carbon copy to Mitchell, stating that an article by a journalist about a campaign fundraiser was scheduled for publication the following day. At this time an unsigned memorandum was prepared containing personal information about the journalist and describing his financial affairs.

It stated that during recent years the journalist had not reported any personal income derived from the operation of a corporation in which he had an interest. It also stated that certain facts suggested to IRS professionals that an audit might resultantly be in order. The memorandum also stated that because of the sensitivities of the ongoing inquiry, no audit should be initiated unless directed.

18.1           Memorandum from John Dean to H. R. Haldeman and others, with attachments (received from SSC) 212

18.2           Memorandum, unsigned and unaddressed, re background information on newspaper journalist (received from SSC) 212

19.On June 12, 1972 Colson sent a memorandum to Dean stating that Colson had received a well-informed tip that there were discrepancies in the tax returns of Harold Gibbons, a vice president of the Teamsters Union. Colson stated that Gibbons was an all out enemy and asked that Dean please see if this one could be started on at once. Dean has testified that he put the memorandum in his file and that it remained there.

19 . 1 John Dean testimony , A SSC 1349 , 1480 214

19.2           Memorandum from Charles Colson to John Dean, June 12, 1972, SSC Exhibit No. 45, 4 SSC 1686 216

20. Former Commissioner of Internal Revenue Walters has stated that during the summer of 1972 he was asked by Treasury Secretary Shultz to check on a report by John Ehrlichman that Democratic National Committee Chairman Lawrence O’Brien had received large amounts of Income which might not have been reported properly.

Walters has stated that he reported to Shultz on the IRS’s examination of O’Brien’s returns for 1970 and 1971. Walters has stated that Ehrlichman was not satisfied with the report on the status of O’Brien’s returns and that because of Ehrlichman’s inquiries O’Brien was interviewed during the summer of 1972.

John Ehrlichman

Walters has stated that Ehrlichman was not satisfied

with the interview and that he told Shultz he needed further information about the matter. Ehrlichman has testified that he had learned from a sensitive case report that the IRS was investigating O’Brien and that he called Shultz to complain that the IRS was delaying the audit until after the election.

20.1           Johnnie Walters affidavit submitted to the House Judiciary Committee, June 10, 1974 218

20.2           John Ehrlichman testimony, SSC Executive Session.

February 8, 197A, 110-12 223

21.On or about August 29, 1972 Shultz, Walters and Assistant to the IRS Commissioner Roger Barth telephoned Ehrlichman to report on the IRS investigation of Lawrence O’Brien. Shultz informed Ehrlichman that the IRS had closed the investigation. Ehrlichman complained to Walters that the IRS had been stalling the audit and he told Walters what a bad job he had done.

21.1           John Ehrlichman testimony, SSC Executive Session,

February 8, 1974, 111-13 228

21.2           Johnnie Walters affidavit submitted to the House Judiciary Committee, June 10, 1974 231

22.Walters stated that on September 11, 1972 he went to Dean’s office. Dean gave Walters a list of McGovern staff members and campaign contributors and requested that the IRS begin investigations or examinations of the people named on the list. Walters’ notes of the meeting state that J. E. [John Ehrlichman] asked to make up the list to see what information could be developed and that Dean had not been asked by the President to have this done and did not know whether the President had asked directly that any of this be done. Walters has stated that he advised Dean that compliance with the request would be disastrous for the IRS and for the Administration and that he would discuss the matter with Secretary Shultz and would recommend to Shultz that the IRS do nothing with respect to the request.

22.1           Johnnie Walters affidavit submitted to House Judiciary Committee, May 6, 1974 238

22.2           Johnnie Walters handwritten notes, September 11, 1972 (received from Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation) 242

22.3           List of McGovem staff members and campaign contributors (received from Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation) 244

23 Walters has stated that on September 13, 1972 he discussed with Secretary Shultz the list given him by Dean, showed Shultz the list and advised Shultz that he believed they should not only with Dean’s request to commence examination or Investigation of the people named on the list. Shultz told Walters to do nothing with respect to the list and Walters put it in his office safe.

On July 11, 1973 Walters turned the list over to the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation. On December 20, 1973 the staff of the Joint Committee issued a report stating that it found no evidence that the returns of any persons on the list were screened as a result of White House pressure.

23.1           Johnnie Walters affidavit siibmitted to House Judiciary Committee, May 6, 1974 274

23.2           Johnnie Walters handwritten notes, September 11, 1972 (received from Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation) 278

23.3           Report of the staff of the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation, “Investigation into Certain

Charges of the Use of the Internal Revenue Service for Political Purposes,” December 20, 1973, 7-12 280

24.On September 15, 1972 from about 5:23 until about 5:27 p.m. the President met with Haldeman and discussed, among other things. Dean’s working through IRS. At about 5:27 p.m. Dean joined the meeting from about 5:27 to about 6:00 p.m. the President, Haldeman and Dean had a discussion which did not refer specifically to the IRS. The Committee has received tape recordings of these conversations.

24.1           Tape recording of a meeting between the President and H. R. Haldeman, September 15, 1972, 5:23 – 5:27 p.m., and House Judiciary Committee transcript thereof 288

25.From approximately 6:00 p.m. to approximately 6:17 p.m. on September 15, 1972 the President, Haldeman and Dean continued their meeting. The Committee has not received a tape recording of this portion of the conversation. Haldeman and Dean have testified that the September 15, 1972 meeting there was a discussion of taking steps to overcome the unwillingness of the IRS to follow up on complaints .

fred-thompson

According to a memorandum by SSC Minority Counsel Fred Thompson, Special Counsel to the President, J. Fred Buzhardt has stated that during the September 15, 1972 meeting Dean reported on the IRS Investigation of Lawrence O’Brien.

On May 28, 1974 the Watergate Special Prosecutor moved that the recording of this portion of the conversation be turned over to the appropriate grand juries on the basis that the recording was relevant to alleged White House attempts to abuse and politicize the IRS, including unlawfully attempting in August and September 1972 to have the IRS investigate Lawrence O’Brien.

On June 12, 1974 Judge Sirica granted the motion and ordered that the recording of the conversation from 6:00 to approximately 6:13 p.m. be made available to the Special Prosecutor.

25.1           H. R. Haldeman testimony, 7 SSC 2889 333

25.2           John Dean testimony, 3 SSC 957-58 334

25.3           John Dean testimony, 4 SSC 1535 336

25.4           Memorandum of Dean’s calls and meetings with the President, September 15, 1972 (received from SSC) with accompanying Fred Thompson affidavit, SSC Exhibit No. 70A, 4 SSC 1794-95 337

25.5           Motion for reconsideration and affidavit of Leon Jaworski, May 28, 1974, In re Grand Jury, Misc. 47-73 340

25.6           Transcript of proceedings, June 7, 1974, In re Grand Jury , Misc. 47-73, 12 347

25.7           Order, June 12, 1974, In re Grand Jury , Misc.

Misc. 47-73 348

26.Walters has stated that on or about September 25, 1972 Dean telephoned him and Inquired as to what progress had been made with respect to the list of McGovem campaign workers and contributors which he had given to Walters on September 11, 1972. Walters has stated that I he informed Dean that no progress had been made; that Dean asked if it might be possible to develop Information on fifty, sixty or seventy of the names; and that Walters responded that, although he would reconsider the matter with Secretary Shultz, any activity of this type would be inviting disaster.

Johnnie Walters

Walters has stated that on or about September 29, 1972 he discussed Dean’s request with Shultz and that he I and Shultz agreed that nothing be done with respect to the list. Walters has stated that he did not furnish any name or names from the list nor request any IRS employee or official to take any action with respect to the list.

26.1           Johnnie Walters affidavit submitted to House

Judiciary Committee, May 6, 1974 352

26.2           Johnnie Walters handwritten notes, September 25, 1973 (received from Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation) 356

27.On March 13, 1973 the President met with Haldeman and Dean.

During the conversation the President and Dean discussed, among other things, obtaining information from the IRS.

27.1           Tape recording of a conversation among the President, H. R. Haldeman and John Dean, March 13, 1973, and House Judiciary Committee transcript thereof (received from White House) 360

28.On May 2, 1973 the Center on Corporate Responsibility, Inc. filed suit claiming that it had been unlawfully denied tax-exempt status because of selective treatment for political, ideological and other Improper reasons having no basis in the statute and regulations.

On December 11, 1973 the United States District Court held that the tax exemption had been unlawfully denied. The Court stated that its ruling was based in part on the failure of the White House to comply fully with discovery orders. The Court found that the inference of political Intervention had been unmistakably raised.

28.1     Opinion, Center on Corporate Responsibility V. Shultz, 368 F. Supp. 863, 871-72 438

STATEMENT OF INFORMATION AND SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

1.   On or about March 21, 1970 Special Counsel to the President Clark Mollenhoff sent a memorandum to H. R. Ualdeman transmitting material on the taxes of Governor George Wallace’s brother, Gerald Wallace.

Mollenhoff has stated that he had been instructed by Haldeman to obtain a report from IRS on investigations relating to Governor George Wallace and Gerald Wallace; that he had been assured by Haldeman that the report was to be obtained at the request of the President; that he obtained the report from the IRS; and that Mollenhoff did not give a copy of the report to anyone other than Haldeman or discuss the substance of it with anyone else until after the appearance of an article on April 13, 1970 regarding confidential field reports, and IRS investigation of charges of corruption in the Wallace Administration and the activities of Gerald Wallace. Former Commissioner of Internal Revenue Randolph Thrower has stated that an IRS investigation concluded that the material had not been leaked by the IRS or the Treasury Department.

Thrower has stated that thereafter he and the IRS Chief Counsel met with Haldeman and Ehrlichman at the White House and discussed with them the seriousness of the leak and the fact that unauthorized disclosure of IRS information constituted a criminal act.

1.1Memorandum from Clark Mollenhoff to H. R. Haldeman, March 21, 1970 (received from Watergate Special Prosecution Force) 36

1.2Washington Post , April 13, 1970, Bll 37

1.3Clark Mollenhoff affidavit submitted to House Judiciary Committee, June A, 19 74 38

1.4Randolph Thrower affidavit submitted to House Judiciary Committee, May 24, 1974 40

MEMORANDUM THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTOH March 21,’ 1970

FROM:      Clark Mollenhoff

SUBJECT:     Gerald Wallace and IRS

Attached is a copy of the material on the Gerald Waallic e tax matter. As you will see, it’s a large case..

The summary makes it apparent the investigation is not conclusive at th)s state, although it would appaar that there is a possibility of a rather large criminal case.

It would seem advisable to let this matter mature a bit, although there might be some advantage in having the Commissioner ask for one or more of the tax returns. This request, which could be complied with through Xerox copies, would not interfere with the investigation and might tend to males the investigators more dilige^

WASHINGTON POST, APRIL 13, 1970, B 11

IRS Probes Wallace Lurleen Reigns

By Jack Anderson

A tpccUl lasK

The probe, which began an a small scale daring the Johnson administration, had focused on the backdoor activities of Gerald Wallace, the former governors brother, law partner and political association to Gerald Wallace, a ali^t, be spectacled man of 90, had fallen into awdden wiralth iiBcc his’ famous brother became governor in 1062. Although Gerald was only three year< out of law school and seldom appeared in court, he has funneled enough money through his law office to move from a mode).t apartment to a lush, SlVacre cattle farm.

lurleen wallace

Alleged Kickbacks

The government Is investigating charges that Gerald Wallace and Rankin File, the mighty Speaker of Alabama’.”; House of Delegates, collected kickbacks on .slate and federal highway contracts. Part of the irony is alleged to have been {turned over t« George Wallace to fuel hU IBM presidential campaign, in which he promised to restore “law and order” to the nation.

Fito allegedly turned the kickbacks over to Gerald Wallace. Both men vigorously denied any wrong doing.

The task force is also looking into a possible link between Gerald Wallace and Alabama’s notorious liquor agent system, under which political cronies of the reigning governor collect fat fees on the sale of liquor to the state.

Confidential field, reports, made available to this column quote Alabama informants as saying that Gerald Wallace has boasted of receiving (400,000 in commissions on state liquor sales. In Alabama, all liquor is sold in state-owned stores.

The Internal Revenue Service’s audit division, in its confidential findings, has alleged that Gerald Wallace omitted legal-free income from his tax returns in 1967 and 1988 after deducting large losses from his cattle farm, he reported a total taxable income of $100,M4 in 1907 and $65,960 in I196a.

Probe Expanded last Jan. 20, the case was referred to Internal Revenue’s crack intelligence division, which handles criminal investigations. A group of agents from various southern offices was Immediately assembled in Alabama.

They have expanded the probe until it now includes alleged kickback schemes involving state highway paving contracts, textbook sales, engineering contracts and misuse of funds at the state docks in Mobile.

The federal agents are also asking questions about the following state political figures:

Attorney General MacDonald Gallion, State Treasurer Agnes Raggett, former State Finance Director Seymore Trammell, State Docks Director Houston Feaster and his assistant, Jim Scott, and State Senators Roland Cooper and Alton Turner.

Seymore Trammell

Itshould be emphasized, of course, that the investigation is still in its preliminary stages, and no formal charges have been brought against anyone.

My associate, Britton Rume, flew to Montgomery, Ala., to discuss the investigation with Gerald Wallace. He acknowledged that be was under tax investigation.

‘They have got 47 clients on me right how,” he said bitterly. “You all are trying to beat George Wallace. You’re not interested in my tax returns.”

U1583804

Wallace’s Story

He swore he had never collected a kickback and, although his law practice was his main source of income, had never represented any state highway contractors or

liquor companies. He angrily rejected the suggestion that the Wallace law firm was used in any kickback scheme. He also denied that his brother was still practicing law with him and declared that George Wallace no longer had space. in the firm’s office.

However, Hume visited the Wallace law office, which is located in a rickety second-story walkup a few blocks from the state capitol. He found the dingy suite still contains an office with George Wallace’s name on the door and a desk inside piled with papers.

1970. Bill-McCiure Syndlyi^jjat.

1.   3 CLARK MOLLEMOFF AFFIDAVIT, JUNE 4. 1974

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY AFFIDAVIT

District of Columbia) ss : CLARK R. MOLLENHOFF, being first duly sworn, deposes and says:

1.   I was appointed Special Counsel to the President in July

1969. I remained in that position until June 1970, at which time I resigned from the White House staff.

2.   Because my responsibilities at the White House included

investigation of allegations of corruption or mismanagement in government, I had authority from the President to periodically obtain certain tax returns from the IRS.

3.   Early in 1970 I was instructed by H. R. Haldeman to obtain a report from the IRS on its investigation of alleged illegal campaign contributions relating to the 1968 presidential campaign of Governor George Wallace and unreported income received by his brother, Gerald Wallace.

Wallace and his brothers

4.   I initially questioned Mr. Haldeman’s instruction, but

upon his assurance that the report was to be obtained at the request of the President, I requested the report of IRS Commissioner Randolph Thrower.

5.   On March 20, 1970 I received a report on the IRS investigation from Assistant IRS Commissioner Donald Bacon.

6.   On March 21, 1970, I delivered the report to Mr. Haldeman, on his assurance that it was for the President. I did not give a copy of the report to anyone else nor did I discuss it with anyone. iM\^<X •”X^’^ (38)

 1.   3 CLARK MOLLEMOFF AFFIDAVIT, JUNE 4, 1974

7.   On April 13, 1970 a report appeared in Jack Anderson’s

column about the IRS investigation. Shortly thereafter, I was requested to meet with Messrs. Haldeman, Ehrlichman and Ziegler. At that meeting they accused me of having leaked the IRS report to the press. I denied having done so and told them that the only copy of the report had gone to Mr. Haldeman.

8.   Thereafter Commissioner Thrower questioned me about the

leak. I informed him that I had delivered the only copy of the report to Mr. Haldeman and had not leaked the information, that Mr. Haldeman had attempted to blame me for the leak, and that I believed that the leak had occurred at the highest White House level.

CLARK R. MOLLEraOFF

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1974.

1.4RANDOLPH THROWER AFFIDAVIT. MAY 24. 1974 AFFIDAVIT

STATE OF GEORGIA COUNTY OF FULTOK

Personally appeared before me, the undersigned attesting officer, Randolph VL Thrower, who, being duly sworn, deposes and says as follows .

This statement is made upon the basis of my best recollection of the facts and the sequence in which they occurred, without my having had the benefit of reference to files and other materials in the possession of the Internal Revenue Service which would permit a more precise statement.

In the summer of 1970. Clark Mollenhoff, Special Assistant to the President, telephoned ne to inquire about an extensive field examination which the IRS was conducting into the possible diversion of political contributions for the benefit of private individuals in the 1968 campaign of George Wallace of Alabama. A brief statement as to the current status of the investigation had been included in our most recent “Sensitive Case Report.” For many years reports on the status of sensitive cases within the IRS had been given a very limited and controlled distribution within the Commissioner’s staff and a copy had custonslrily been sent by special courier to the Secretary of the Treasury. I understand that customarily the Secretary of the Treasury would advxse the President of any matters in the sensitive case report about which the President, by reason of his official duties and responsibilities, should be advised.

As I recall, Vx . Kollenhoff advised me that the report on the Wallace campaign was desired by or on behalf of the President and in connection with his official responsibilities. In earlier discussions over the disclosure of confidential information in the possession of the IRS , t’Ir. Mollenhoff and I had reached an understanding that this would constitute a legal justification for the disclosing.

1.4 RASDOLPH THROWER AFFIDAVIT, MAY 24, 1974

Pursuant to tAr. Mollenhoff’s request, I asked the office of the Assistant Comissioner-Corapliance to prepare for the Vrnite House a summarization of the Vfallace investigation in the form of a memorandum from me. A memorandum was prepared which I reviewed and, after a few modifications, sent to Mr. Nbllenhoff at the Vftaite House.

A few days later a column by Jack Anderson described the IRS investigation of charges of diversion of contributions in the I968 Wallace campaign. It appeared to me that the Jack Anderson report came directly out of my memorandum. I called in the Assistant Commissioner Inspection, Vernca D. Acree, and asked him to investigate the possibility of an unlawful disclosure of confidential tax information. I asked him, in particular, to study carefully my memorandum, in relation to other factual summaries in the ISS files, in order to determine whether we coixld identify any possible source for the Jack Anderson report other than my own memorandum such -as other reports in the hands of the IRS or taxpayers’ counsel.

I also asked him to investigate the possibility of a leak in the movement of my memorandum within the IRS or the Treasury Department at the time I was leaving the city on official business and asked that he attempt to have a report available on my retxirn.

On my return Mr. Acree advised that my memDrandun was clearly the source of the Jack Anderson column. He advised further that he had traced the movement of my memorandum within the Service and the Treasury Department and found nothing to suggest that the leak had occurred in these offices.

Thereupon I called Mr. Mollenhoff who, before I coxild state my complaint, announced that he knew what I was caJ-ling about and wanted to assure me that he had not breached the operating procedures which he and I had developed and that he was in no way responsible for the leak. I told him that while it was a very serious breach of the laws against disclosure, I had felt confident that he was not responsible. I stated, nevertheless, that I v;a3 greatly dlaturbed by it and wanted to know how it possibly could have occurred. Kir. Ibllenhoff replied that the responsibility was at a higher

1.4 RANDOLPH THBOWER AFFIDAVIT, MAY 24. 1974

level. I asked, “Hovr high?” His response was to the effect that it occurred at the highest level or at the very top. VThile I do not recall the precise language used, I received the impression that he vras referring to Mr. Haldeman or possibly Messrs. Haldeman and Erlich.ian .

Thereafter I telephoned John Erlichman to discuss the disclosure and arranged for a meeting at the White House with hin and ilr.

Haldeman which was attended hy the Chief Counsel of the IRS, K. Martin Worthy, and myself. In the conference M-r. Worthy and I discussed the seriousness of the leak and the fact that an unauthorized disclosure constituted a criminal act. I did not cake any accusations as I-ir. Mollenhoff had asked ne to hold in confidence what he had told me as to the apparent source of the leak.

Haldeman and Erlichnan did not indicate to Mr. Worthy and me the source of the leak but did take our complaint seriously and assured us that they would cooperate in undertaking to prevent such incidents in the future and would call the gravity of the situation to the attention of those in the White House who might from time to time have access to such information.

June 11. 1974

2. On Septeniber 21, 1970 White House aide Tom Charles Huston sent a memorandum to Haldeman transmitting a report on an investigation by the IRS Special Service Group of political activities of tax-exempt organizations. Huston discussed administrative action against the organizations and stated that valuable intelligence-type information could be turned up by IRS as a result of their field audits.

2.1Memorandum from Tom Charles Huston to H. R.

Haldeman, September 21, 1970, with attachments,

SSC Exhibit No. 42, 3 SSC 1338-45 44

2.1TOM CHARLES HUSTON MEMORANDUM^ SEPTEMBER 21, 1970,

SSC EXHIBIT NO. 42, S SSC 1238-1245 WITH ATTACHMENTS

1338 Exhibit Na 42 MEMORANDUM ^Xyt^”

THE WHITE HOUSE

September 21. 1970

MEMORANDUM FOR: H. R. HALDEMAN SUBJECT; CtS b Ideological Organization*

I am attaching a copy of a report from the IRS on the activities of It*

“Special Service Croup” which is supposed to monitor the activities of

Ideological organizations [e.g. , Jerry Rubin Fund, Black Panthers, etc. and take appropriate action when violations of IRS regulations turn up. You will note that the report is long on words and short on substance.

Nearly 18 months ago, the President indicated a desire for IRS to move against leftist organizations taking advantage of tax shelters. They’ve been pressing IRS since that time to no avail.

What we cannot do in a courtroom via criminal prosecutions to curtail the activities of some of these groups, IRS could do by administrative action.

Moreover, valuable intelligence-type Information could be turned up by IRS as a reaalt of their field audits.

Read more here –

Full text of “Statement of information : hearings – Internet Archive

http://archive.org/stream/statementofinfor08unit/statementofinfor08unit_djvu.txt

***

Newly released tapes reveal Reagan and Bush support for Nixon over Watergate

The 340 hours of recordings were made by President Nixon in 1973 from April through July.
The 340 hours of recordings were made by President Nixon in 1973 from April through July.

 After he announced the resignations of four top officials in his administration in 1973, Richard Nixon swore he was done with talking about Watergate, according to the last batch of tapes released by the National Archives.

Gone were his chief of staff, H.R. “Bob” Haldeman; his domestic affairs adviser, John Ehrlichman; White House lawyer John Dean; and Attorney General Richard Kleindeinst, a longtime friend. Nixon broke the news in his first public address about the scandal that would eventually bring down his presidency — and as he tried to console the jettisoned Haldeman, he insisted it was his last.

“Well, its a tough thing, Bob, for you, for John, the rest,” he said after the April 30, 1973, speech. “But goddammit, I’m never gonna discuss this son of a bitch Watergate thing again. Never, never, never, never.”

Of course, like much of what he had just told Americans, it didn’t turn out to be true. Nixon would be forced to deal with Watergate over and over again in the next year or so, culminating with his own resignation in August 1974 — a development forced by the discovery of conversations like those released Wednesday by the National Archives.

The 340 hours of recordings are the last installment of a record that has kept historians busy for four decades. They run from April 1973 through that July, when the microphones were turned off after a probing Congress learned of the tapes.

The new batch includes calls of support from two future presidents following the April 30 speech: Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush.

Click here to listen or on the photos to the the tapes: Last batch of Nixon tapes on Watergate released

Nixon with no expletives deleted

Nixon: He did his best

“We’re still behind you out here, and I wanted you to know that you’re in our prayers,” said Reagan, then governor of California and a rising conservative star.

Story behind ‘Our Nixon’s’ unique home movies

“How nice of you to say that,” Nixon replied. “Well, let me tell you this. That we can be — all each of us has a different religion, you know? But goddammit, Ron, we have got to build peace in the world, and that’s what I’m working on.”

Bush, then the Republican Party’s chairman, told Nixon, “I was really proud of you, and my golly, I know it was tough, and I just wanted to tell you that.” Nixon replied, “Well, good for you, George.”

The Watergate scandal began to unravel with the June 1972 break-in at the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee. Five operatives of the Nixon re-election campaign were arrested in the attempt to illegally wiretap phones at the offices, located in the Watergate office building in Washington.

The inner demons that drove Nixon

The subsequent investigations revealed that within days of the arrests, Nixon had discussed warning FBI agents away from the burglary probe by having the CIA claim the break-in was part of a national security operation. Nixon resigned shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court ordered him to turn over a recording of that conversation to investigators.

Other tapes out Wednesday include Nixon discussing China with National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger and meeting with evangelist Billy Graham, the widow of baseball star Roberto Clemente and the Brazilian soccer legend Pele, who spoke of wanting to spread his sport to the United States. He’s heard speaking with a variety of world leaders, including West German Chancellor Willy Bradt and Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau.

The tapes captured a June 1973 summit meeting between Nixon and Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev, in which Brezhnev bemoaned complaints about the world’s two superpowers.

Nixon’s trip to China

Richard Nixon discusses homosexuality

Click here to listen to the the tapes: Last batch of Nixon tapes on Watergate released

Four lessons from Nixon’s failed presidency

“There are some people who keep throwing in this idea of there being two superpowers in the world who are out to dictate their, as they say, dictate their will, to foist their will upon others, and so forth,” Brezhnev said. “Now, but, are we to blame for being big? Are we to blame for being strong? What can we do about it? That is the way it is.”

And Nixon talks of winding down the war in Vietnam and the return of American prisoners of war, justifying the December 1972 bombing raids on Hanoi that he credited with their release.

“The North Vietnamese had reneged on the agreement, they had attached conditions with regard to return of POWs, they had attached conditions on the return of civilians themselves,” he told Roger Shields, a Pentagon official working with the former prisoners. “We said no conditions. That’s why we had to bomb. One of the major reasons we had to bomb. And it worked.”

***

As the mainstream media continues to release the Nixon Watergate hoax the real story as yet to be exposed…………..

The Alabama Project | lisaleaks

Nixon’s Assassination Team

As in any political assassination conspiracy, some things are very difficult to prove.

After years of research, the ‘Watergate‘ hoax has finally unraveled.

This strong circumstantial evidence is presented in the spirit of truth and transparency.

“The individual is handicapped by coming face-to-face with a conspiracy so monstrous he cannot believe it exists. The American mind simply has not come to a realization of the evil which has been introduced into our midst. It rejects even the assumption that human creatures could espouse a philosophy which must ultimately destroy all that is good and decent.”

–J. Edgar Hoover

I have some intriguing material  that was written by a key player in Governor George Wallace’s 1972 campaign.

These historic documents were written by Seymore Trammell, Campaign Director and confidant to Governor George Wallace, including memos of then Attorney General John Mitchell and other primary sources. These references also include the notorious whereabouts of ‘W.’ Bush’s “nomadic years,” and how Herbert W. Bush dispatched his son as an undercover operative to spy on the Wallace campaign.

Seymore Trammell and Gov. Wallace were closely involved with five Presidents: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard Nixon , George Herbert Walker Bush and George W. Bush.

Nixon and LBJ

”It’s not enough for Nixon to win.  He’s going to have to put some people in jail.”

— Lyndon B. Johnson, worrying about Nixon’s vindictive streak towards his political opponents, 1969

After his release from Maxwell Federal Prison, Seymore and his son Warren, pieced together the events that led up to the conspiracy and subsequent attempt to assassinate him Oct. 31st of 1971, in Montgomery, Alabama, and Governor George Wallace on May 15th, 1972 in Laurel, Maryland during his Presidential campaign speech.

https://lisaleaks.com/2012/10/18/the-alabama-project/

Resources:

Full text of “Statement of information : hearings – Internet Archive

Last batch of Nixon tapes on Watergate released

Comments – Nixon’s Enemies List Search Results

The Alabama Project | lisaleaks