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F-16

For the first time ever, a Boeing-modified F-16 flies without a pilot in the cockpit from Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Called the QF-16, the plane will serve as a full-scale aerial target for pilots and other military units to greatly enhance training.

As a pilotless F-16 roared into the sky Sept. 19 at Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., members of Boeing QF-16 team and the U.S. Air Force celebrated.

The flight represented the first unmanned QF-16 Full Scale Aerial Target flight.  Put another way, fighter pilots now have an adversary for which to train against that prepares them like never before.

Two U.S. Air Force test pilots in a ground control station at Tydall remotely flew the QF-16, which is a retired F-16 jet modified to be an aerial target. While in the air, the QF-16 mission included a series of simulated maneuvers, reaching supersonic speeds, returning to base and landing, all without a pilot in the cockpit.

“It was a little different to see it without anyone in it, but it was a great flight all the way around,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Ryan Inman, Commander, 82nd Aerial Targets Squadron. “It’s a replication of current, “real world situations” and aircraft platforms they can shoot as a target. Now we have a 9G capable, highly sustainable aerial target.”

Prior to the QF-16, the military used a QF4 aircraft, which was a modification of the F4 Phantom, a Vietnam-era fighter. The modified QF16 provides pilots a target that performs closer to many jets flying today.

The QF-16s were all retired aircraft. Boeing retrieved them from DavisMonthan Air Force Base in Arizona and restored them for flight.

At Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., the military will ultimately use QF-16s for weapons testing and other aerial training.

Unmanned QF-4 crashes near Holloman – Holloman Air Force

Holloman Airforce Base unmanned QF-4 drone crash

 2/7/2014 – HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, NM — At approximately a QF-4 Drone crashed on White Sands National Monument, approximately four to five miles west of Runway 22.

‘The unmanned aircraft was conducting a routine training mission. The monument was closed in advance of the test mission and will remain closed until further notice. There is no threat to the public at this time.

The cause of the crash is unknown at this time, but the incident will be investigated.’

The aircraft was assigned to Detachment 1, 82d Aerial Targets Squadron, which is a tenant unit at Holloman assigned to the 53rd Weapons Evaluation Group.

Additional information will be released as it becomes available on the Holloman website at holloman.af.mil Photos of and fact sheets for the QF-4 Drone can also be found on the Holloman website. (Note: There is still no information posted at Holloman website)

Update report from WASHINGTON — US Air Force said a drone crashed at a national park in New Mexico during a training mission.
The Unmanned QF-4 crashed at White Sands National Monument near Holloman Air Force Base in west New Mexico, Xinhua quoted officials as saying.

The monument had been closed in advance to the test mission and would remain closed until further notice, according to the report..
The cause of the crash was not immediately known, and base officials were investigating.

This crash follows a QF-4 crash in July 2011 (ASN Aircraft accident 06-JUL-2011 McDonnell Douglas QF) where a manned version of the aircraft crashed near Hope, N.M. In that incident, the pilot safely ejected and was unharmed. The last two unmanned crashes occurred at Holloman AFB in August 2006 and September 2004. (Crash stirs debate on drone safety)

The base, home of the 49th Wing of the US Air Combat Command, provides combat-ready airmen, F22 Raptor, and trains MQ1 Predator and MQ9 Reaper pilots and sensor operators.
It is also home to the world’s longest, at 50,188 feet, and fastest, approaching 10,000 feet per second (3,050 m/s, Mach 9), test track.

Please Note: These facts have yet to be made available.

http://www.holloman.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123379568

 

WASHINGTON — US Air Force said a drone crashed Friday at a national park in New Mexico during a training mission.

The unmanned QF-4 Drone crashed at White Sands National Monument near Holloman Air Force Base in west New Mexico, Xinhua quoted officials as saying.

The monument had been closed in advance to the test mission and would remain closed until further notice, according to the report..

The cause of the crash was not immediately known, and base officials were investigating.

The base, home of the 49th Wing of the US Air Combat Command, provides combat-ready airmen, F-22 Raptors, and trains MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper pilots and sensor operators.

It is also home to the world’s longest, at 50,188 feet, and fastest, approaching 10,000 feet per second (3,050 m/s, Mach 9), test track.

– See more at: https://www.authintmail.com/article/north-america/us-air-force-drone-crashes#sthash.c8hm2iQr.dpuf53rd Weapons Evaluation Group [53rd WEG] – GlobalSecurity.

WASHINGTON — US Air Force said a drone crashed Friday at a national park in New Mexico during a training mission.

The unmanned QF-4 Drone crashed at White Sands National Monument near Holloman Air Force Base in west New Mexico, Xinhua quoted officials as saying.

The monument had been closed in advance to the test mission and would remain closed until further notice, according to the report..

The cause of the crash was not immediately known, and base officials were investigating.

The base, home of the 49th Wing of the US Air Combat Command, provides combat-ready airmen, F-22 Raptors, and trains MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper pilots and sensor operators.

It is also home to the world’s longest, at 50,188 feet, and fastest, approaching 10,000 feet per second (3,050 m/s, Mach 9), test track.

– See more at: https://www.authintmail.com/article/north-america/us-air-force-drone-crashes#sthash.c8hm2iQr.dpuf53rd Weapons Evaluation Group [53rd WEG] – GlobalSecurity.

Remote Control – A possible key to 9/11

9 11 sculpture

If they can Remote Control an F-16, the most complex aircraft, they had the technology for RCTORemote Control Take Over of the 4 Boeing 757 and 767 passenger jets on 9/11/2001. Just add Pilot Locked Out Of Navigation And Communication (Poonac) and you have the same effect and evidence as a hijacking by terrorists. It is a possibility we need to formally investigate.

What should the U.S. Air Force do with its aging fleet of aircraft? After all, the aircraft bone yard is already pretty crowded.

How about using them for target practice?

Boeing has been turning outdated planes into unmanned drones that the Air Force can use in targeting drills.

“I love the F-16 and brag about it a lot — and now to get something ready to take off on its own, so somebody else can shoot it down, makes it a little bittersweet in my eyes,” U.S. Air Force test pilot Jason Clements said in a video released by Boeing.

And to get a sense of just how sophisticated the drone controls are, considering that the planes not only took off and landed without a pilot, they actually reached supersonic speeds and simulated combat maneuvers during the test drills.

 

 

Boeing - QF-16 Unmanned Fighter Full Scale Aerial Target First Flight [720p]

 

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